Available courses

Principal Instrument - Steelpan
Charlton Alfonso

Principal Instrument - Steelpan

Students are required to undertake intense study in voice or an instrument on which he / she has demonstrated reasonable performing skills. The course will be tailored to the individual student’s level and needs and will cover a broad repertoire relevant to the particular area of study. A juried examination is held each semester in which students are expected to display satisfactory progress from one semester to the next; the grade given at the examination will go towards a percentage of the student’s overall semester grade for the course.

Music Theory I
Charlton AlfonsoAriesky Garcia

Music Theory I

Principles of notation, scales (major and minor), keys, intervals, and triads; identification of triads and seventh chords in inversion; part-writing using rot position and first inversion triads are taught mainly through music of the common practice period (1600-1900).

Music Theory III
Charlton AlfonsoAriesky Garcia

Music Theory III

Chromatic harmony, the use of secondary dominants, secondary leading tone chords, modulations, mode mixture and the Neapolitan chord are the emphases.

Curriculum: Methods and Media
Sana Rose

Curriculum: Methods and Media

This course examines the contemporary theories, methods,media and practices that underpin the learner-centred art classroom. Such a classroom is grounded in the understanding that learners are not passive receptors of knowledge but that they actively construct knowledge in their attempt to understand the world. In such a learning environment teacher and student become co-constructors of knowledge.

Keyboard Harmony I (Stephen Shaw-Naar)
Stephen Shaw-Naar

Keyboard Harmony I (Stephen Shaw-Naar)

This course will develop keyboard skills which will enable piano students to transpose music. They will be also harmonizing melodies which involves the use of chord progressions and cadences. The students will also gain an understanding of the circle of 5ths which demonstrates how keys are related. The course is delivered in a keyboard lab setting.


TEACHING PRACTICE (PRACTICUM)
Ornisea Williams-Hird

TEACHING PRACTICE (PRACTICUM)

This course is regarded as the major component of the education core course for the Education Specialist, therefore, it is specifically designed to further equip teachers with the knowledge, attitude and skills required to plan and teach the visual and performing arts as a subject in

their own right, drawing from their own body of knowledge which is obtained from the art forms.


Performance Lab III Semester 1

Performance Lab III Semester 1

Weekly preparation for the 3rd-year concert - includes modules on preparing performance riders, stage plots and input lists as well as their programmes, fliers and charts as there are also weekly performance critiques.

Performance Lab I Semester 1

Performance Lab I Semester 1

Weekly preparation for 4th-year concert - includes modules on preparing performance riders, stage plots and input lists as well as their programmes, fliers, charts as well as arrangements and press kits - there are also weekly performance critiques.

Vocal Skills (FMLP)
Trevelle Clarke-Whyne

Vocal Skills (FMLP)

This is a group class where students develop secondary vocal skills that will enable them to function in the classroom or group settings primarily as beginning soloists or ensemble performers. 


Keyboard Skills III
Kyran O

Keyboard Skills III

Students develop secondary keyboard skills that will enable them to function in the classroom and group settings primarily as accompanists and ensemble performers. This course is designed for non-keyboard majors only. 

Keyboard Skills III

Keyboard Skills III

Students develop secondary keyboard skills that will enable them to function in the classroom and group settings primarily as accompanists and ensemble performers. This course is designed for non-keyboard majors only. 

Guitar Skills I
Shanelle Richards

Guitar Skills I

Students develop secondary guitar skills that will enable them to function in the classroom and group settings primarily as accompanists and ensemble performers.

Vocal Skills
Trevelle Clarke-Whyne

Vocal Skills

This is a group class where students develop secondary vocal skills that will enable them to function in the classroom and group settings primarily as beginning soloists or ensemble performers.   

Keyboard Skills 1
Kyran O

Keyboard Skills 1

Students develop secondary keyboard skills that will enable them to function in the classroom and group settings primarily as accompanists and ensemble performers.
 
 Students develop secondary keyboard skills that will enable them to function in the classroom and group settings primarily as accompanists and ensemble performers. 

Contemporary Aural and Singing III

Contemporary Aural and Singing III

This course will reinforce the concepts explored in MU113A and MU113B while continuing to further expand the aural perception and understanding of the student. Much emphasis will be placed on the practical application to the written aspect of music
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theory. This includes identifying, analyzing and reproducing rhythmic, melodic and harmonic structures via activities such as sight singing, rhythmic reading and various types of dictations.
 
 

Contemporary Aural and Singing I
Trevelle Clarke-Whyne

Contemporary Aural and Singing I

This course develops the students’ aural perception and analysis and the emphasis will be placed on the practical application to the written aspect of music theory. 

Aural and Sight Singing I
Allison Wallace

Aural and Sight Singing I

This course develops the students’ aural perception and analysis and the emphasis will be placed on the practical application to the written aspect of music theory. 

Contemporary Music Theory IV - G.Beyens
Gerd Beyens

Contemporary Music Theory IV - G.Beyens

 This course focuses on the nomenclature, and aural recognition, of scales, chords, chord progressions and compositional devices commonly utilized in jazz and popular music. The experience expands to facilitate the notation and performance of rhythms, syncopated patterns, chord extensions and substitutions through an in-depth analysis of classic jazz standards

Contemporary Music Theory II - G.Beyens
Gerd Beyens

Contemporary Music Theory II - G.Beyens

Writing, and aural recognition, of scales, triads, seventh chords, meter, rhythms and harmonic devices commonly utilized in jazz and popular music as well as notation of music related to the rhythm section, and analysis of jazz performances.
 

Aurals and Sight Singing II (Contemporary) - T Clarke-Whyne
Trevelle Clarke-Whyne

Aurals and Sight Singing II (Contemporary) - T Clarke-Whyne

 This course develops the students’ aural perception and analysis and the emphasis will be placed on the practical application to the written aspect of music theory. 

Principal Instrument -Debra-Ann Davidson
Debra-Ann Davidson

Principal Instrument -Debra-Ann Davidson

This is the space where all students in Ms. Debra-Ann Davidson's studio will be able to access course syllabi, and supporting materials. It is also a place where students will be notified of important imformation.

Form and Analysis I
Debra-Ann Davidson

Form and Analysis I

This is an advanced Music Theory class in which we will analyze music from the Common Practice Era, ca 1600-1910. This is a fully online course; however, there will be periodic synchronous instruction via zoom. You will be told in advance the dates of these class meetings. They will take place on the scheduled class time Mondays from 3pm-5pm, so please leave that time reserved for these meetings.

Principal Instrument - Piano
Kieran Murray

Principal Instrument - Piano

(Music Education Major)

Students are required to undertake intense study in voice or an instrument on which he / she has demonstrated reasonable performing skills. The course will be tailored to the individual student’s level and needs and will cover a broad repertoire relevant to the particular area of study. A juried examination is held each semester in which students are expected to display satisfactory progress from one semester to the next; the grade given at the examination will go towards a percentage of the student’s overall semester grade for the course. A student Is required to pass both the course work and the examination in order to pass the course. One hour lessons. 

Available Options:

Piano, Voice, Guitar, Clarinet, Flute, Trumpet, Trombone, euphonium, tuba, strings (violin, double bass), Steelpan in Classical and Contemporary Music Studies.

Modern Guitar, Electric Bass and Drum Kit & Percussion, Hand drums and percussion in Contemporary Music Studies concentration only.

Music Theory III
Allison Wallace

Music Theory III

Chromatic harmony, the use of secondary dominants, secondary leading tone chords, modulations, mode mixture and the Neapolitan chord are the emphases.

Music Theory IV
Allison Wallace

Music Theory IV

The study of, augmented sixth chords, chromatic alterations, Bach chorale harmonizations, and compositions using the simple forms of the 18th and 19th centuries, is the focus at this level.

 Aural and Sight Singing II
Allison Wallace

Aural and Sight Singing II

This course further develops the students’ aural perception and analysis and the emphasis will be placed on the practical application to the written aspect of music theory. The students will explore the minor scale, dominant chord, compound time and dotted rhythms.

Harmony and Arranging I
Gerd Beyens

Harmony and Arranging I

Study of the musical elements and devices commonly utilized in Jazz / Pop forms and the acquisition of skills leading to the development of a personal style in arranging for various combinations of instruments / voices.

Harmony and Arranging II - G.Beyens
Gerd Beyens

Harmony and Arranging II - G.Beyens

Study of the musical elements and devices commonly utilized in Jazz and Popular music forms and the acquisition of skills leading to the development of a personal style in arranging for various combinations of instruments and voices. This is a continuation of the principles studied in “Harmony and Arranging I”.

 Aural and Sight Singing III
Allison Wallace

Aural and Sight Singing III

This course further develops the students’ aural perception and analysis and the emphasis will be placed on the practical application to the written aspect of music theory. 

 Aural & Sight Singing IV
Allison Wallace

Aural & Sight Singing IV

Prerequisite: MU 210A.
Modulations, two part dictation and chromaticism are introduced at this level.

 Music Theory I
Paula-Kay Beswick

Music Theory I

Principles of notation, scales (major and minor), keys, intervals, and triads; identification of triads and seventh chords in inversion; part-writing using rot position and first inversion triads are taught mainly through music of the common practice period (1600-1900).

Western Music: An Overview         Debra-Ann Davidson
Debra-Ann Davidson

Western Music: An Overview Debra-Ann Davidson

This is a blended course that introduces students to the classic repertoire of   Western musical culture, and the socio/political events that informs this music.  It explores the 
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significant landmarks in music history from the Medieval period through the early decades of the 20th century.  The course will use both online and face-to-face modalities.

Traditional Jamaican Drumming
Reuben Betty

Traditional Jamaican Drumming

Foundation conga drumming techniques taught through the use of Jamaican rhythms and those from our African heritage. Ensembles of Principal Instruments 1 Credit per semester Students are required to take a prescribed number of credits in the ensemble related to their principal study and area of specialization. The experience provides the opportunity for the development of musicianship skills and knowledge associated with the particular ensemble. Ensembles may be

repeated for credit. Main ensembles offered are:

MU 120 Choir

MP Orchestra

MP 122 Steel Pan Ensemble

MP 123 Drumming Ensemble

MP 133 Percussion Ensemble

MP 140 Concert Band

MP 141 Vocal Jazz Ensemble

MP 222 Mixed Instrumental Ensemble

 Arranging and Composition for Classroom I
Kyran O

Arranging and Composition for Classroom I

Prerequisite: MT 211B or MT212BP

This course focuses on the study and use of fundamental arranging and composing devices and techniques for various instrumental and vocal combinations.  Students are required to score assignments using traditional and non-traditional methods. All pieces are performed. 


Methods and Materials in Music I
Andre

Methods and Materials in Music I

This methods course reflects the historical, social and cultural milieu in which music takes place in the schools of our nation. The course focuses not only on giving our students the necessary musical tools needed for a career in music education but also prepares them for the pedagogical skills needed to effectively design, and manage learning and instruction at the secondary level in a Jamaican school. Emphasis is given to planning, teaching and evaluating music lessons and to utilizing techniques and materials from a variety of approaches. The cultural framework in which music education takes place is focused on so that students will not only be exposed to musical ideas from outside the geographical region in which they live but an emphasis will be placed on materials and musical ideas from Jamaica and the Caribbean region. The course will operate as a learning laboratory where students will function as both student and teacher. The course is a two part one: the first part focuses primarily on giving students the methods and materials that they will need in their career as music educators; the second part will broaden the offerings to include more intense work on pedagogy and educational organization aimed at preparing students for teaching practice and the ultimate goal of being effective educators in secondary school music.

Measurement and Evaluation in the Music Classroom
Garnet Mowatt

Measurement and Evaluation in the Music Classroom

This course will offer a broad foundation of all aspects of assessment and measurement as well as evaluation  including, but not limited to, other forms of data collection applied in music education. Topics in this course will include psychometrics; measurement of musical aptitude, achievement, performance, and affect; measurement tools, including assessment instrument development; administration and scoring of assessments; and reporting systems.

Keyboard Harmony I
Orville Hammond

Keyboard Harmony I

This course will develop keyboard skills which will enable piano students to transpose music. They will be also harmonizing melodies which involves the use of chord progressions and cadences. The students will also gain an understanding of the circle of 5ths which demonstrates how keys are related. The course is delivered in a keyboard lab setting.


Jazz and Popular Music Ensemble III (MU242A)
Gerd BeyensKieran Murray

Jazz and Popular Music Ensemble III (MU242A)

These courses focus on the fundamentals of jazz improvisation and performance practice of jazz and pop music repertoire,performed on students’ principal instruments collectively and in an ensemble setting. This is an eight semester sequence ending with advanced level improvisation and complex arrangements.

Because of Covid19 we won't be able to actually play together. We will use backings tracks instead. Each student records his/her improvisation and sends it as an mp3. This will happen weekly.

Enjoy!

Gerd Beyens

Music Technology I
Derek Been

Music Technology I

This course is a basic introduction to the properties of sound, number systems and computers. The course will also introduce filters and spectrum processors like equalizers and the uses of delay; also transducers- microphones and their polar patterns; MIDI, sequencing, recording considerations and synchronization; Synthesizers and signal flow. There is an introduction to notation software.


 Foundation of Music Education
Ornisea Williams-Hird

Foundation of Music Education

The course is an introduction to the music education profession in general and as it has been practiced in Jamaica. Students will explore historical, social, and philosophical considerations and foundations that relate directly to the Caribbean music educator, and include a critical evaluation of some contemporary trends in the field. Students will explore the history of Jamaican music education, and curricular achievements in school music programmes. Other topics include a broad look at different music educator philosophers and theorists, understanding the self, the roles of the music teacher, and tools of teaching. The course will place emphasis on practical approaches to teaching both in the classroom and rehearsal setting.

 Methods and Materials in Music II
Andre

Methods and Materials in Music II

This methods course reflects the historical, social and cultural milieu in which music takes place in the schools of our nation. The course focuses not only on giving our students the necessary musical tools needed for a career in music education but also prepares them for the pedagogical
skills needed to effectively design, and manage learning and instruction at the secondary level in a Jamaican school. Emphasis is given to planning, teaching and evaluating music lessons and to utilizing techniques and materials from a variety of approaches. The cultural framework in which
music education takes place is focused on so that students will not only be exposed to musical ideas from outside the geographical region in which they live but an emphasis will be placed on materials and musical ideas from Jamaica and the Caribbean region. The course will operate as a learning laboratory where students will function as both student and teacher. Students will be asked to teach mini-lessons and be involved in pedagogical practice modules in schools. The
course is a two part one: the first part focuses primarily on giving students the methods and materials that they will need in their career as music educators; the second part will broaden the offerings to include more intense work on pedagogy and educational organization aimed at preparing students for teaching practice and the ultimate goal of being  effective educators in secondary school music.

 Choral Techniques
Trevelle Clarke-Whyne

Choral Techniques

This course is designed to provide students with the theoretical knowledge and practical skills required to teach choral ensembles in secondary schools.   Among topics to be addressed in this phase of the course are vocal production, an introduction to effective rehearsal techniques, the changing voice, musicianship skills, choral conducting, and evaluation and assessment. 


 Steel Band Techniques
Kyran O

Steel Band Techniques

This course is designed to provide students not only with basic steel pan playing techniques but also the theoretical knowledge, historical background, and practical skills required to teach steel bands in secondary schools. Students will be introduced to the instruments in the steel band family and must be actively involved in the class' steel band for the duration of the semester.

 Music Technology III
Michael HarrisKieran Murray

Music Technology III


A more in depth look at music composition and production with the aid of a Digital Audio Workstation. 

 Music Technology IV

Music Technology IV

This course takes a more in-depth look at the studio process and practical applications of concepts learned in the Music Technology III. A final thesis/project is required. Prerequisite: MU 409

Performance Lab Semester 2 - Year 4
Michael Harris

Performance Lab Semester 2 - Year 4

Weekly preparation for 4th-year concert - includes modules on preparing performance riders, stage plots and input lists as well as their programmes, fliers, charts as well as arrangements and press kits - there are also weekly performance critiques.

Performance Lab Semester 2 - Year 3

Performance Lab Semester 2 - Year 3

Weekly preparation for the 3rd-year concert - includes modules on preparing performance riders, stage plots and input lists as well as their programmes, fliers and charts as there are also weekly performance critiques.

Assessment in the Art Classroom
Sana Rose

Assessment in the Art Classroom

This course introduces student-teachers to the field of assessment and the shifts and tension points existing within the field. Specifically it provides them with opportunities to explore the idea of learner-centred assessment and to examine their roles within it. Student-teachers will question their assumptions about how students learn, the best way to teach and how to know if teaching has been successful. Throughout the course students will investigate and apply diverse approaches to varying assessment situations that may arise within the classroom. The course is centred in the philosophy of constructivism and the vision is for student teachers to become conversant with the principles and the key concepts of learner-centred assessment and become empowered to apply these to classroom contexts.

Art Curriculum Development
Sana Rose

Art Curriculum Development

This course allows students to delineate and examine important theories, concepts, and events that influence contemporary art education curriculum development. Students will examine the events and the historical and socio-political currents that drive art education curriculum development in Jamaica and internationally. This will make them more cognizant of the relationship between local and international trends in curriculum development. Using the local curriculum standards and guides students will develop teaching units that foster learners’ cognitive, social, physical emotional and perceptual growth. Throughout the course students will discuss the role of the art specialist; the function of subject matter; the role methods and materials play in facilitating learning and; the connection of art education curriculum to other disciplines and governmental policies.

Modern Jamaican Art
Petrina Dacres

Modern Jamaican Art

This course introduces students to Jamaican Art and Design and provides a forum for students to engage with the artistic history of the country. It examines the ways in which the past has provided a source of inquiry and iconographical explorations for Jamaican artists in the twentieth century and the multiple themes and artistic languages they engaged. Broad themes explored include the representation of the body, the influence of Rastafari, art in public spaces, and the relationship between art, identity and politics. Importantly, it demonstrates the contribution of Jamaican art to World Art and more specifically modern and contemporary art and design.


Exploring Philosophies of Art Sem 1 2020/2021
Petrina Dacres

Exploring Philosophies of Art Sem 1 2020/2021

This course provides students with an introduction to multiple ideas of art and artists. It uses the texts of philosophers and scholars and practicing artists and artistic movements to reflect on the changing perceptions of the nature and purposes of art. The class also examines case studies of artistic controversies to tease out some of the issues under discussion.

Time Based Media l
Yakub Grant

Time Based Media l

Time Based Media exposes students to an introductory level of motion graphics, video and basic animation and utilizing several software platforms. Students will be introduced to basic storyboarding, developing narratives and working through sequencing. This course will provide students with the fundamental requisite knowledge to asses future directions in their interest in animation and new media pursuits.

Aesthetics: Exploring Philosophies of Art
Veerle Poupeye

Aesthetics: Exploring Philosophies of Art

This course explores the aesthetic concepts central to the understanding and enjoyment of works of art. The meaning of concepts used in discussing and the understanding of iconography and other elements and their expression particularly in Jamaican Art are discussed. Stylistic trends in Jamaican art, relationships between the visual arts and other artistic expressions in Jamaica and art as a subjective experience of artist and viewer.

 Art Education

Art Education

Art Education means different things to different people. I believe that art education is an opportunity to nurture children to find truth through imagination, effort, collaboration, and cultural literacy.

Issues in Drawing & Painting 1A
Sana Rose

Issues in Drawing & Painting 1A

This course will examine the context and practice of the visual arts in the disciplines of drawing and painting and their relationship to visual representation.  Students will be encouraged to see drawing and painting as related disciplines, with drawing as both the initial, immediate tool for expression of ideas as well as an end in itself, and painting as an expressive medium which is linked to drawing. Students will investigate the human figure and its potential for expressing ideas, as well observational drawing and painting as a vehicle for developing personal visual language. Emphasis will be placed on introducing students to a range of technical and conceptual approaches to drawing and painting through which they can develop their understanding of visual representation.

Art Education 2

Art Education 2

Art Education means different things to different people. I believe that art education is an opportunity to nurture children to find truth through imagination, effort, collaboration, and cultural literacy.

Research Methods 1B (Semester 2 2020)
Lesley-Gail Atkinson Swaby

Research Methods 1B (Semester 2 2020)

This course offers exposure to Research Methods and procedures for conducting original research projects. Research types and formats, language and terminology, measurements and instruments are studied. Also explored are the problems of validity and reliability and the procedures and methods available for establishing these. Planning, conducting and presentation of an original research or thesis are studied through student seminars based on preliminary research in selected topics. A practical and uniform method to be followed in the writing and presentation of the research paper is introduced.

Drawing I | CTRK2 Thomas
Phillip Thomas

Drawing I | CTRK2 Thomas

Lecturer: Phillip Thomas
I
n Drawing 1, the model is used as a reference to approach the study of shape, form and space in terms of line, tone and volume in relation to the figure.  The element of balance and proportion as well as individual and expressive approach to the figure by combining media in unusual ways is encouraged. Students will be exposed to using practical techniques such as measuring for proportion, perspective and formatting of the pictorial plane.

Integrated 2D/3D CTRK2 DTRK2
Jheanell Forbes-BrahamChungknight n/a

Integrated 2D/3D CTRK2 DTRK2

FD102A :  Integrated 2D/3D CTRK2 and DTRK2: Lecturers: Forbes-Braham and Chung Knight
The course lends itself to the investigation of problem solving through conceptual and actual means utilizing the fundamental elements of visual language. This will enable students to recognize the inter-relatedness and integrative processes that emphasize the synergy of 2D and 3D elements. Students will explore the subtle differences between 2D and 3D, and acquire an understanding of how they inform each other. Students also engage with varying materials and integrated explorations of the formal fundamental concepts of studio practice.

 Integrated 2D/3D ATRK1 BTRK1
Camille CheddaYves Yearwood

Integrated 2D/3D ATRK1 BTRK1

FD102A :  Integrated 2D/3D ATRK1 BTRK1: Lecturers: Camille Chedda & Yves Yearwood
The course lends itself to the investigation of problem solving through conceptual and actual means utilizing the fundamental elements of visual language. This will enable students to recognize the inter-relatedness and integrative processes that emphasize the synergy of 2D and 3D elements. Students will explore the subtle differences between 2D and 3D, and acquire an understanding of how they inform each other. Students also engage with varying materials and integrated explorations of the formal fundamental concepts of studio practice.

Drawing I | ATRK 1 Chedda
Camille CheddaYves Yearwood

Drawing I | ATRK 1 Chedda

In Drawing 1, the model is used as a reference to approach the study of shape, form and space in terms of line, tone and volume in relation to the figure.  The element of balance and proportion as well as individual and expressive approach to the figure by combining media in unusual ways is encouraged. Students will be exposed to using practical techniques such as measuring for proportion, perspective and formatting of the pictorial plane.
Lecturer: Camille Chedda


Drawing I | BTRK1 Yearwood
Yves Yearwood

Drawing I | BTRK1 Yearwood

Lecturer: Yves Yearwood
In Drawing 1, the model is used as a reference to approach the study of shape, form and space in terms of line, tone and volume in relation to the figure.  The element of balance and proportion as well as individual and expressive approach to the figure by combining media in unusual ways is encouraged. Students will be exposed to using practical techniques such as measuring for proportion, perspective and formatting of the pictorial plane.

Time Based Media

Time Based Media

Time Based Media exposes students to an introductory level of motion graphics, video and basic animation and utilizing several software platforms. Students will be introduced to basic storyboarding, developing narratives and working trough sequencing. This course will provide students with the fundamental requisite knowledge to asses future directions in their interest in animation and new media pursuits.

STUDIO PRACTICE PAINTING
Camille Chedda

STUDIO PRACTICE PAINTING

Students will undertake specific projects as they explore and develop an understanding sophisticated understanding of how the elements and principles of design is employed through exposure to the discipline of Studio Practice. Throughout the semester students will engage with various materials and integrated explorations while referencing their Integrated 2D/3D Studio. This will further inform them of the formal fundamental concepts that under-pins contemporary art-making which will be enhanced by specific readings and critical thinking and discussions.

Art in Context
Phillip Thomas

Art in Context

This course investigates the connections that exist between the making of art and environment in which art is made. This includes the student’s personal/psychological response to social, historical and political issues. The discussion and analysis of information through the presentation of slides, video and guest lecturers will heighten students’ awareness of concerns in contemporary art practices as well as develop a more analytical approach to their own studio practice. The utilization of text, drawing, photography or other relevant means of documentation in an art book/journal to be presented at the end of the semester.

Assemblage/Collage
Camille Chedda

Assemblage/Collage

This course provides students with the opportunity to develop an interdisciplinary approach to Painting and/or Sculpture through an exploration of the medium of assemblage, collage and installation.

Mural Design I
Greg Bailey

Mural Design I

This course explores historical and contemporary approaches to mural painting and design with an emphasis on concepts and philosophies developed in the 20th century. Students will be encouraged to regard the city of Kingston as an open classroom. Community involvement and collaboration with public and private sectors will be encouraged and designs created as coursework will be placed in the public domain. Emphasis will be placed on media research. Students will be encouraged to think outside the traditional notion of mural painting (pigment on surfaces) in an effort to forge new possibilities in murals.

Caribbean Identity: The New Black Culture I
Omari Ra

Caribbean Identity: The New Black Culture I

This course seeks to align students with concepts ideas and aesthetics related to the Caribbean including its historic context. It stresses the importance of research and study of Caribbean literature, politics and socio-cultural geography as a necessary pre-requisite in order to have a concrete understanding of image-making and other concerns.

New Media and Process I
Oneika Russell

New Media and Process I

This course encourages students to develop ideas through the process of performance and time-based projects using media such as photography, digital imaging and video. The student is introduced to the possibilities of using basic recording methods to document transitory or ephemeral activity along with more traditional means such as drawing and text. Prerequisite – Media and Process

Media and Process
Phillip Thomas

Media and Process

This course focuses on the process of exploring materials. Students will explore a broad range of media and techniques, from the conventional to the unconventional, whilst dealing with the formal aspects of painting such as composition and investigation of pictorial space. Individual and group

discussion of contemporary concerns in painting will be used to stimulate the students’ analytical ability.

Issues in Representation I
Phillip Thomas

Issues in Representation I

In this course the student will work from life models,landscape on location, and still life in order to explore traditional and contemporary methods of representation in Painting. Students will be encouraged to experiment with materials, composition and scale. The works of the super

realist and other contemporary artists will be researched and discussed and compared with the works of the old masters. Prerequisite – Foundation Studies

STUDIO PRACTICE INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES

STUDIO PRACTICE INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES

Students will undertake specific projects as they explore and develop an understanding sophisticated understanding of how the elements and principles of design is employed through exposure to the discipline of Studio Practice. Throughout the semester students will engage with various materials and integrated explorations while referencing their Integrated 2D/3D Studio. This will further inform them of the formal fundamental concepts that under-pins contemporary art-making which will be enhanced by specific readings and critical thinking and discussions.

Interdisciplinary Research Process (Seminar)
Petrona Morrison

Interdisciplinary Research Process (Seminar)

This course focuses on developing an individual studio project which is informed by intense studio research and synthesis of knowledge gained in interdisciplinary practice. Through a process of experimentation and research students will expand their project proposal, exploring ideas and thematic concerns with an emphasis on developing their own visual language and approach to integration. Through guided discussion with lecturers and invited guests they will critically analyse their studio projects and contextualize their work in relation to contemporary theoretical frameworks and practice. 



STUDIO PRACTICE SCULPTURE
Raymond Watson

STUDIO PRACTICE SCULPTURE

Students will undertake specific projects as they explore and develop an understanding sophisticated understanding of how the elements and principles of design is employed through exposure to the discipline of Studio Practice. Throughout the semester students will engage with various materials and integrated explorations while referencing their Integrated 2D/3D Studio. This will further inform them of the formal fundamental concepts that under-pins contemporary art-making which will be enhanced by specific readings and critical thinking and discussions.

The Body and Process II

The Body and Process II

This course focuses on the psychological notion of the body. Issues such as culture, sexuality, disease, technology, gender, evolution and religion will be explored. Students will be required to complete reading assignments and make research presentations to the class.

ROTATION PRINTMAKING  STUDIO PRACTICE
Cleve Bowen

ROTATION PRINTMAKING STUDIO PRACTICE

 students will be  introduce to  printmaking’s practices, history and techniques as a gateway for exploring materials and ideas to create form, and explore basic two dimensional elements; line, form, surface, space and structure.


FD103A STUDIO PRACTICE JEWELLERY
Duane Bennett

FD103A STUDIO PRACTICE JEWELLERY

Students will undertake specific projects as they explore and develop an understanding sophisticated understanding of how the elements and principles of design is employed through exposure to the discipline of Studio Practice. Throughout the semester students will engage with various materials and integrated explorations while referencing their Integrated 2D/3D Studio. This will further inform them of the formal fundamental concepts that under-pins contemporary art-making which will be enhanced by specific readings and critical thinking and discussions.

FD103A STUDIO PRACTICE CERAMICS
Anna Kay Cuffe

FD103A STUDIO PRACTICE CERAMICS

Students will undertake specific projects as they explore and develop an understanding sophisticated understanding of how the elements and principles of design is employed through exposure to the discipline of Studio Practice. Throughout the semester students will engage with various materials and integrated explorations while referencing their Integrated 2D/3D Studio. This will further inform them of the formal fundamental concepts that under-pins contemporary art-making which will be enhanced by specific readings and critical thinking and discussions.

Independent Study IB
Omari Ra

Independent Study IB

This course offers to final year students the opportunity to further articulate and expand their personalized approach to studio practice. This is a project or body of work based on a theme chosen by the student that allows them to develop content, realize ideas and initiate the individual thinking required of professional artists. Tutorials are scheduled with the Department Head/Coordinator to ensure the satisfactory development of the project. The independent project forms part of the final examination, and each student must be prepared to discuss the project in depth with the examiners and be able to put into concise language, the concepts and ideas involved. Students are expected to use the Research Methods II course to conduct research to develop their ideas for their Independent Study projects. The research paper for Research Methods II should be related to the Independent Study.

Ceramics Independent Study IA
E. Margaret McGhie

Ceramics Independent Study IA

This course offers to final year students the opportunity to develop a personalized approach to studio practice. This is a project or body of work based on a theme chosen by the student that allows them to develop content, realize ideas and initiate the individual thinking required of professional artists. Tutorials are scheduled with the Department Head/Coordinator to ensure the satisfactory development of the project. The independent project forms part of the final examination, and each student must be prepared to discuss the project in depth with the examiners and be able to put into concise language, the concepts and ideas involved. Students are expected to use the Research Methods II course to conduct research to develop their ideas for their Independent Study projects. The research paper for Research Methods II should be related to the Independent Study.

Surface Design II
E. Margaret McGhie

Surface Design II

This course follows on from Surface Design 1, and teaches additional techniques of surface decoration. The student designs and executes work choosing an appropriate technique, size and form for his or her individual preference.

Ceramic Sculpture I
E. Margaret McGhie

Ceramic Sculpture I

This course will focus on mixed media approaches to express individual ideas. Students will have the opportunity to explore the potential of the materials being used for large or small 3D structures. Model-making and studies to illustrate the relationship between ideas and processes will also be

covered.

Studio Ceramic Processes I (Workshop)
Anna Kay Cuffe

Studio Ceramic Processes I (Workshop)

This workshop will provide a series of the necessary technical underpinnings as the foundation to providing the springboard for the ceramic experience of the student artist and designer. Students will engage in an intensive immersion in the various practices. This workshop is open to design

majors as well as studio specific student artist. 0 Credit.

Multimedia Ceramics I
Anna Kay Cuffe

Multimedia Ceramics I

This course is designed to broaden the scope of production,creativity and experimentation. The limitation of executing a single piece is expanded by means of mass production of identical pieces in a short time. The course also provides possibility of producing ‘new’ individualistic pieces.

Fashion Independent Study IA
Gianna Fakhourie

Fashion Independent Study IA

This course offers to final year students the opportunity to develop a personalized approach to studio practice. This is a project or body of work based on a theme chosen by the student that allows them to develop content, realize ideas and initiate the individual thinking required of professional artists. Tutorials are scheduled with the Department Head/ Coordinator to ensure the satisfactory development of the project. The independent project forms part of the final examination, and each student must be prepared to discuss the project in depth with the examiners and be able to put into concise language, the concepts and ideas involved. Students are expected to use the Research Methods II course to conduct research to develop their ideas for their Independent Study projects. The research paper for Research Methods II should be related to the Independent Study.

Pattern Making & Construction I

Pattern Making & Construction I

It is critical that students understand techniques for measuring and calculating body dimensions and how those 3D measurements translate to lines, shapes and cuts  on 2D material. The student’s introduction to the concept of working in the duo dimensional world of the fashion designer will centre on the basic 2-Dimensional skirt pattern or “skirt block”, which is used to construct a wide range of skirts.


Portfolio Collection Development II
Jill Becker

Portfolio Collection Development II

This course focuses on:   

a. Styling

b. Fashion Show production

 Clothing is only one component of the Fashion Industry and cannot be seen in isolation. Students will explore the use of complementary and juxtaposing hair, makeup and accessories for styling their own creations. Students will be shown how to style their creations in a way that reflects the overall image that they are trying to project both for runway and photo shoot scenarios. This is expected to generate additional materials that will be added to the student’s fashion portfolio.

 Since, ultimately, their creations are intended to be worn, the fashion show serves as the fashion designer’s exhibition. The coordination and teamwork that is necessary for Fashion Show production and an appreciation of the role of fashion shows in showcasing and marketing their own work will be emphasized in this module.

 

On completion of this course these students will be responsible for organizing and managing all aspects of the official Department Fashion Show.

Woven Imagery I
Laura Lee Jones

Woven Imagery I

This course explores weaving as a drawing medium utilizing supplemental warp/weft, and double cloth. Along with direct encounter with material and weaving system at the loom, each student will make a hard bound note/journal which will include drawings, drafting, writings, bibliography, vocabulary and personal evaluation and all relevant individual explorations and research throughout the course.


Pattern Making & Construction III
Grace Kelly

Pattern Making & Construction III

This course focuses on:   

a. The Dress Block

b. The Trouser Block

Combining the bodice block with the skirt block provides the basis for the dress block. This basic dress block is further modified to create secondary dress blocks that are the foundation for a wide range of dress patterns and styles.

The fact that today a single garment; jeans, can be the foundation of an entirely separate international fashion industry underscores the importance of understanding and mastering the trouser block. The addition of the dress and trouser blocks to the skirt, bodice, and sleeve blocks rounds off the principle blocks used in most pattern making and garment construction assignments. An ability to manipulate these principle blocks will provide the foundation for a student that is competent enough to tackle most pattern making assignments.


Introduction to Weaving I

Introduction to Weaving I

This workshop focuses on fundamental tapestry techniques, as well as constructing and dressing a frame loom.  Experimentation with methods of colouring and dyeing for use in woven fabrics is included.  Individuals will be encouraged to focus on developing personal imagery in tapestry.

AIMS:

·    To develop an appreciation of tapestry weaving techniques.

·    To demonstrate ability to apply aesthetic considerations when using the techniques.

·    To master the methods of weaving in order to create tapestries using the techniques learnt.

To expose students to the work of contemporary fibre artists and cultural traditions utilizing tapestry techniques.

STUDIO PRACTICE TEXTILES, FASHION AND FIBRE ARTS
Laura Lee Jones

STUDIO PRACTICE TEXTILES, FASHION AND FIBRE ARTS

Students will undertake specific projects as they explore and develop an understanding sophisticated understanding of how the elements and principles of design is employed through exposure to the discipline of Studio Practice. Throughout the semester students will engage with various materials and integrated explorations while referencing their Integrated 2D/3D Studio. This will further inform them of the formal fundamental concepts that under-pins contemporary art-making which will be enhanced by specific readings and critical thinking and discussions.

 Textile Design Independent Study IA
Laura Lee Jones

Textile Design Independent Study IA

This course offers to final year students the opportunity to develop a personalized approach to studio practice. This is a project or body of work based on a theme chosen by the student that allows them to develop content, realize ideas and initiate the individual thinking required of professional artists. Tutorials are scheduled with the Department Head/ Coordinator to ensure the satisfactory development of the project. The independent project forms part of the final examination, and each student must be prepared to discuss the project in depth with the examiners and be able to put into concise language, the concepts and ideas involved. Students are expected to use the Research Methods II course to conduct research to develop their ideas for their Independent Study projects. The research paper for Research Methods II should be related to the Independent Study.

Weaving Independent Study IA
Laura Lee Jones

Weaving Independent Study IA

This course offers to final year students the opportunity to develop a personalized approach to studio practice. This is a project or body of work based on a theme chosen by the student that allows them to develop content, realize ideas and initiate the individual thinking required of professional artists. Tutorials are scheduled with the Department Head/ Coordinator to ensure the satisfactory development of the project. The independent project forms part of the final examination, and each student must be prepared to discuss the project in depth with the examiners and be able to put into concise language, the concepts and ideas involved. Students are expected to use the Research Methods II course to conduct research to develop their ideas for their Independent Study projects. The research paper for Research Methods II should be related to the Independent Study.

 Layered Textiles (Mandatory Workshop)
Katrina Coombs

Layered Textiles (Mandatory Workshop)

This course will broaden students’ knowledge of traditional layering methods. Examples will be drawn from various parts of the world known for this type of work. These methods will be explored along with other surface design techniques such as hand and machine embroidery, quilting and patchwork. Students are encouraged to use these techniques to develop ideas for sculptural/relief approach to fabric, moving away from the flat planar textile. 0 Credits.


 Contemporary Studio Practices and Design Procedures
Katrina Coombs

Contemporary Studio Practices and Design Procedures

This course prepares students to design for small studio production by introducing them to the practices of contemporary design studios and their procedures and how it differs from the printing industry. The experience of exploring contemporary fabric creation will also inform the fine art studio experience. Site visits to studios are made and students’ report on their observation forms part of the course requirement. Current trends in textile designs are examined, as well as site differences between the small studio printer and industrial printing practices.  This course also stresses basic professional techniques in the construction of a designer’s first sample.  Students gain insight into the relationship between creative design and quality of finished sample.


 Non-Loom Weaving (Mandatory Workshop)
Katrina Coombs

Non-Loom Weaving (Mandatory Workshop)

Focus is on using basketry, and finger weaving techniques as a means of expressing ideas. These techniques will expose students to a variety of methods for exploring fibre sculpture. Students will be encouraged to focus on developing personal imagery using these techniques.

 Introduction to Weaving I (Mandatory Workshop)
Katrina Coombs

Introduction to Weaving I (Mandatory Workshop)

This course provides an introduction to basic weaving. It focuses on tapestry techniques, using the frame loom. Experimentation with methods of colouring and dyeing for use in woven fabrics is encouraged.

 Pattern Making & Construction I
Robert Hall

Pattern Making & Construction I

It is critical that students understand techniques for measuring and calculating body dimensions and how those 3D measurements translate to lines, shapes and cuts on 2D material. The student’s introduction to the concept of working in the duo dimensional world of the fashion designer will centre on the basic 2 Dimensional skirt pattern or “skirt block”, which is used to construct a wide range of skirts.

 Natural Dyes, Fibres and Properties
Miriam Hinds Smith

Natural Dyes, Fibres and Properties

This course is a study of natural and synthetic fibres and  fabrics, including testing methods for strength and colour- fastness.

As young artists, researchers, designers and art educators in training, it is prudent that a sound grasp of and exposure to as many aspects of creative research areas with potential for advanced exploration be explored. In order to provide a strong reference-base for future and further creative explorations that you will encounter, this Natural Dyes Fibres and Properties course will enable much  experimentation of concepts and content that will lend to responding to issues within society in relation to eco-sustainability, human impact and our environment

Concerns of environmental issues will be discussed, researched and examined in this course to look at ways going forward that we can determine to positively impact and contribute to our health, way of life and our economy.

Topics to cover:

  • History of Natural Dyes
  • The Invention of Synthetics 
  • From Fibre to Filament (Natural and Synthetic)
  • Extraction and Discovery ( Welcoming Happy Accidents)
  • Environmental Ethics - What will be your carbon footprint?
  • Within our Context: Naturally dyed 
  • Heath and Safety



 Textile History and Contemporary Printing I
Laura Lee Jones

Textile History and Contemporary Printing I

This is a study of traditional and contemporary dyeing and printing techniques of textiles of Japan, Africa and India, and investigation of social, cultural and historical context of textiles from these regions. Students will also engage in the exploration and examination of the exciting possibilities
these techniques offer to contemporary artists.

 Textile Design Surface Design (Mandatory Workshop)
Katrina Coombs

Textile Design Surface Design (Mandatory Workshop)

This workshop will cover processes, techniques and insight that are valuable in solving design problems relevant to the applied art practices of Textiles but also provides insights into surface treatment of image repetition applicable for Ceramics, Graphic Design and Jewellery.  Innovative techniques, media, and texture in creating designs are explored to produce various effects.  Procedures and methods including the use of the computer are also explored which will help to expand, student’s creativity.


Graphic Design I
Shauna Gaye Murray-Coke

Graphic Design I

This course will concentrate on the basic symbol development through a creative problem solving for complex concepts. The idea is for the student to learn to present a visual message that is clear, stylistically beautiful and memorable.

FD103A | STUDIO PRACTICE | VIS COMM
Robert Archer

FD103A | STUDIO PRACTICE | VIS COMM

Students will undertake specific projects as they explore and develop a sophisticated understanding of how the elements and principles of design are employed through exposure to the discipline of Studio Practice within three departments of their choice. Throughout the semester students will engage with various materials and integrated explorations while referencing their Integrated 2D/3D Studio. This will further inform them of the formal fundamental concepts that underpin contemporary art-making which will be enhanced by specific readings and critical thinking and discussions.

Introduction to Visual Communication
Shauna Gaye Murray-Coke

Introduction to Visual Communication

This course introduces the concepts, vocabulary, and processes relating to visual communication. Basic skills and the concepts needed across various graphics disciplines are discussed. This course provides an overview of the design communication process including conceptualization, creative processes, terminology and technology. Students will be furnished with multiple communication opportunities, enabling them to interpret, use, appreciate and create compositions using both conventional and digital media in ways that advance thinking decision making and communication.

Visual Communications Independent Study
Robert ArcherRichard GriffithsLaura Lee JonesSusan Lee QueeShauna Gaye Murray-CokeSara Shabaka

Visual Communications Independent Study

The independent project forms part of the final examination, and each student must be prepared to discuss the project in-depth with the examiners and be able to put into concise language, the concepts and ideas involved.

Visual Communication Independent Study IA
Robert ArcherShauna Gaye Murray-Coke

Visual Communication Independent Study IA

This course offers to final year students the opportunity to develop a personalized approach to studio practice. This is a project or body of work based on a theme chosen by the student that allows them to develop content, realize ideas and initiate the individual thinking required of professional artists. Tutorials are scheduled with the Department Head/Coordinator to ensure the satisfactory development of the project. The independent project forms part of the final examination, and each student must be prepared to discuss the project in depth with the examiners and be able to put into concise language, the concepts and ideas involved. Students are expected to use the Research Methods II course to conduct research to develop their ideas for their Independent Study projects. The research paper for Research Methods II should be related to the Independent Study.

Interactive Media
Shauna Gaye Murray-Coke

Interactive Media

This is a practical, introductory course to the world of interactive and digital media design. The focus will be on creating interactive experiences that are both functional and engaging. This will be approached from various points-of-view: design, usability, technique, and entertainment. We will discuss strategies concerning how to make things work well while making it easy to understand and fun for your audience. This is a class for beginners and assumes no previous experience or expertise. We will, however, move at a quick pace. It is absolutely essential that you work hard and stay on top of all the class material.

The course generates discussion of usability, colour, layout, typefaces, negative space, image quality and placement and so much more.

Exhibition and Display Design
Shauna Gaye Murray-CokeSara Shabaka

Exhibition and Display Design

The elements of thematic display and exhibition design in commercial and institutional arenas are examined. Professional growth in conceptual ability, ideology and skills development is stressed. Students design visual presentations and develop techniques for varied applications, learning materials sourcing, graphics, merchandise, budget planning and installation factors.

Packaging Design
Sara Shabaka

Packaging Design

This is a study of packaging graphics and 3D design with emphasis on a variety of products. Packages are analyzed and positioned from a marketing point of view. Students develop visual graphics and colour schemes suitable for individual products. Typical projects include export oriented food and cosmetic products from Jamaica and the Caribbean region.

Method and Media IA
Robert Archer

Method and Media IA

After introducing students to basic concepts and techniques in illustration with careful thought and research, they are ready to approach another stage in interpreting and rendering illustrations that will stand out in any circle clarifying the idea that conceptualization is not a fleeting thought; various techniques and media will be explored to show that one can be guided in the thought process thus producing objective and functional illustrations with provocative and entertaining results for visual communication.

Design with Type
Sara Shabaka

Design with Type

This course will cover the execution of lettering for reproduction. The computer will be used to introduce the basic principles of typography design and typesetting.

Illustration IV
Rachel MossShauna Gaye Murray-Coke

Illustration IV

This course provides the opportunity to develop a personal style of illustration supported by examination of historical trends.

Illustration III
Rachel Moss

Illustration III

This course will concentrate on individual solutions to advanced illustration problems while considering communications on a broad scale.

Graphic Design IB
Sara Shabaka

Graphic Design IB

This course will concentrate on the design of all categories of print media from postage stamps to posters, brochures, book covers etc. The idea is for student to learn to present a visual

Digital Design IA (Workshop)
Shauna Gaye Murray-Coke

Digital Design IA (Workshop)

This course will introduce the creative processes, methods,strategies and tools used in developing concepts and final designs for various forms of media distribution. Along with understanding these technical approaches, students will also attempt to explore the psychological implications of these processes by investigating the role of the designer as an active agent of change and the impact of new technological developments on society and culture. 0 Credits.

Design Procedure for Graphics (Mandatory Workshop)
Robert ArcherShauna Gaye Murray-CokeSara Shabaka

Design Procedure for Graphics (Mandatory Workshop)

This course will cover the equipment, materials, techniques and procedures required in a graphic design studio to produce everything from layouts to mechanical and prepress electronic art. Emphasis is placed on the use of the computer as well as traditional techniques. 0 Credits.

Illustration II
Robert ArcherShauna Gaye Murray-Coke

Illustration II

Course Outline

After introducing students to basic concepts and techniques in illustration with careful thought and research, they are ready to approach another stage in interpreting and rendering illustrations that will stand out in any circle clarifying the idea that conceptualization is not a fleeting thought; various techniques and media will be explored to show that one can be guided in the thought process thus producing objective and functional illustrations with provocative and entertaining results for visual communication.

Demonstration of techniques, group and personal critiques are conducted augmented with guest speakers.

 

Course Objective

  • Personal development with an emphasis on building critical awareness through exposure to a number of concepts and learning experiences leading to the creation of unique ideas and solutions
  • The course aims to draw on individual styles thus developing a personal vision through their illustration style
  • Exercise and demonstrate the use and mastery of the elements of design understanding the use of form, composition and colour to affect the fundamental procedure in illustration
  • The student will employ a sequence of sketching, from thumbnail to comprehensive to final comps
  • To prepare the student for the technological age (where computers are being used for the decimation of information of visual message)
  • The student will demonstrate an adequate level of illustration skills and concept, as well as a broad understanding of techniques and their application
  • Students are capable of assuming roles and responsibilities in the profession
Students learn all aspects of producing illustrations from initial concept to finished artwork. Students are encouraged to develop mastery of composition and draughtsman-ship and to find creative solutions considering tonal contrast and colour harmony.



Illustration IA
Robert Archer

Illustration IA

This course will concentrate on individual solutions to illustration assignments while considering communications on a broad scale. Emphasis is on concept, content and execution. Students explore media, technique and printing applications and develop the skillful handling of these.

Visual Communication IB
Shauna Gaye Murray-CokeSara Shabaka

Visual Communication IB

Part 2 of the year long course Visual Communication. Students continue learning layout and typography as the fundamental language to graphic communication. Students continue to build on the ability to manipulate visual content to create derivative form. Issues of hierarchy, audience, context and research are investigated and applied.

Visual Communication IA
Sara Shabaka

Visual Communication IA

Visual Communication 1A is an introductory class to the process and discipline of Graphic Design (basic layout and typography) as the fundamental language to graphic communication. Students build on the ability to manipulate visual content to create derivative form. Issues of hierarchy, audience, context and research are investigated and applied. In this class you will learn the importance of planning, problem solving, communication and critical thinking as well as exploring the history and culture of Graphic Design. Knowledge will be acquired through a combination of reading, presentations and hands-on experience with projects; using hands-on to digital technology. Software applications include Adobe Illustrator, Adobe Photoshop and Adobe InDesign.

Animation Independent Study
Richard GriffithsSusan Lee QueeShauna Gaye Murray-Coke

Animation Independent Study

This course offers to final year students the opportunity to develop a personalized approach to studio practice.  This is a project or body of work based on a theme chosen by the student that allows them to develop content, realize ideas and initiate the individual thinking required of professional artists.  Tutorials are scheduled with the Department Head/Coordinator to ensure the satisfactory development of the project.  The independent project forms part of the final examination, and each student must be prepared to discuss the project in depth with the examiners and be able to put into concise language, the concepts and ideas involved. Students are expected to use the Research Methods II course to conduct research to develop their ideas for their Independent Study projects.  The research paper for Research Methods II should be related to the Independent Study.

2D CHARACTER CREATION/DESIGN
Nicholas Shelton

2D CHARACTER CREATION/DESIGN

This course will explore of 2D computer character creation. Students will learn to connect intellectually with their respective audience through their artistic and use of composition. Students will plan, organize and conceptualize character art using various media while gaining hands on knowledge of character rigging in industry standard application dedicated to 2D animation application. This course aims to equip students with the requisite skills and knowledge of extensive and complex ideas of 2D computer graphic character creation for Animation and Game Design.


FD103A | STUDIO PRACTICE | ANIMATION
Rachel Moss

FD103A | STUDIO PRACTICE | ANIMATION

Students will undertake specific projects as they explore and develop an understanding sophisticated understanding of how the elements and principles of design is employed through exposure to the discipline of Studio Practice. Throughout the semester students will engage with various materials and integrated explorations while referencing their Integrated 2D/3D Studio. This will further inform them of the formal fundamental concepts that under-pins contemporary art-making which will be enhanced by specific readings and critical thinking and discussions.

 3D Production Animation
Richard GriffithsShauna Gaye Murray-Coke

3D Production Animation

This course is designed to strengthen students’ 3D animation skills by introducing them to the process of 3D animation for production through which they will depict actions that drive and deliver the characters’ emotions and personalities. Students will be introduced to the importance of peer and self-critiques. This course will enable students to access, understand and adjust their animations according to the directions of an art director and /or the intended audience feedback. Students will be introduced to the foundation of a media-based compositing system and 3D camera trackingtools, along with the necessary knowledge of the methods and techniques utilized in the production pipeline.

 Fundamentals of 2D / 3D Compositing
Richard Griffiths

Fundamentals of 2D / 3D Compositing

This course is designed to broaden students’ knowledge of computer graphic image (CGI) with Video and Film elements.  SVA | 76 | 2017-18 The course is divided into two sections where students will
get hands on exposure, applying 3D finishing components to live action footage, as well as integrating and manipulating 3D render layer /passes and arbitrary output variables (AOV’s) for the creation of believable CGI art for animation and film. This course aims to introduce students to two key areas of compositing, using layer based and node-based applications. Students learn to apply this knowledge to basic 2D compositing as well.

 3D Character Rigging
Nicholas Shelton

3D Character Rigging

This course will focus on the foundations of 3D character rigging. Rigging is the process of adding control and functionality to a CG character. It is a process which is similar  to that of the creating a cut-out character using industry- standard software. Students will learn about the tools necessary for character rigging as a job in the animation industry. This course will also develop their knowledge of and skills in using additional tools to aid in the animation of their character.

 3D Modeling Fundamentals
Richard Griffiths

3D Modeling Fundamentals

This course introduces students to the basic principles of building 3 – dimensional objects and environments. Modelling techniques such as wire-framing and rendering. Concepts of 3 – dimensional space and geometrical transformation are reviewed. This course aims to introduce students to 3-D modelling concepts and the creation of organic and in organic forms. To expose students to techniques that will enable students to choose the best approach to realize a given subject.

Introduction to Animation
Rachel MossShauna Gaye Murray-Coke

Introduction to Animation

This course helps to introduce the student to their department of choice for specialization and fundamental underpinning for their chosen field. Each department offers a broad mix of experiences that will strengthen and heighten the personal experiences of each student. Students will engage in several experiential programme designed to stimulate interest in and appreciation for the work of the department. Each course runs for a full semester in each department and aims to help students understand and apply the elements of pure design to the aesthetics of various art forms. Emersion in this area will guide and broaden students’ knowledge in the development of their chosen field. Prerequisite – Studio Practice

 Materials and Lighting
Richard GriffithsShauna Gaye Murray-Coke

Materials and Lighting

This course is designed to allow the student to explore the components of materials, shadows and lights. Students will explore the fundamentals of moods that different lights bring to particular scenes. They will develop an understanding of each component’s attributes, such as shadows reflection, refractions, atmospheres and other components that bring objects, environment and scene to life. This course will introduce aspects of previous concepts learnt in animation courses.

 Introduction to 3D Animation
Richard GriffithsShauna Gaye Murray-Coke

Introduction to 3D Animation

This course is designed to provide students with the tools necessary to create, manipulate and refine a 3D computer animated sequence. It will introduce students to the  application of animation principles in a 3 dimensional environment. This course focuses on only positional animation using 3D controls curves/objects and key framing as well as dependency graphs and their manipulation.
Students will learn and apply the principles of animation to 3D characters and inanimate objects to give an illusion of life.

 Introduction to 2D Animation
Richard Griffiths

Introduction to 2D Animation

This course will provide students with an understanding of the tools and processes that are necessary for creating, manipulating and refining a 2D Computer Animated Sequence. It will introduce students to the fundamentals of animation (motion and timing) as well as animating using a modern 2.5 D application key framing process. Pre-requisite: Time-based Media/Intro. to Digital Foundations

Intermediate Photography
Rachael McIntosh

Intermediate Photography

This course provides students with the opportunity to expand on the basic knowledge acquired in the introductory course. Further exploration of the camera use is encouraged.

Prerequisite: Introduction to Photography


STUDIO PRACTICE PHOTOGRAPHY

STUDIO PRACTICE PHOTOGRAPHY

Students will undertake specific projects as they explore and develop an understanding sophisticated understanding of how the elements and principles of design is employed through exposure to the discipline of Studio Practice. Throughout the semester students will engage with various materials and integrated explorations while referencing their Integrated 2D/3D Studio. This will further inform them of the formal fundamental concepts that under-pins contemporary art-making which will be enhanced by specific readings and critical thinking and discussions.


 Staged Photography in Contemporary Art
Olivia McGilchrist

Staged Photography in Contemporary Art

This course introduces students to staged photography through the examination of the work of Afro-American/ Caribbean artist Renee Cox, and white South African artist Pieter Hugo, as well as others. Students will be introduced to the photographic portrait and staged tableau in  contemporary photographic practice, and will reference the work of artists such as Richard  Avedon, Cindy Sherman, Jeff Wall, Phillip Lorca di Corcia, Yinka Shonibare, Oneil Lawrence,
Marvin Bartley, and Marlon James. This seminar course will be interactive and encourages students to critically engage with works through dialogue. In class discussions students will examine the conceptual and formal framework of specific works. The seminar will be offered to students across disciplines, but is mandatory for students in New Media and Process I.

 Museum Photo Studies
Andrew Smith

Museum Photo Studies

This course is designed to encourage students to take an active interest in the collections and documentation of images to be used as historical evidence for the Institute of Jamaica and similar types of institutions. The objective is to research, visit and document historical sites, maps, artefacts, objects that are vestiges of religion, slavery and the vernacular. This course, under the guidance of the Institute of Jamaica history department, will also include cataloguing, storage and exhibition. Students will conduct site visits to selected museums, and interact with museum professionals.  Museum staff will also deliver lectures on the role of object/ image documentation in collections management, and issues related to Visual Display and Representation.

 Intermediate Photography - SCEAP
Amanda Lazarus

Intermediate Photography - SCEAP

This course provides students with the opportunity to expand on the basic knowledge acquired in the introductory course. Further exploration of the camera use and darkroom is encouraged. Prerequisite: Introduction to Photography

 Studio Photography
Andrew Smith

Studio Photography

This course will introduce students to the fine art and commercial practice of Studio Photography, and its history. It will be the first intensive course detailing the profound potential of the controlled environment in which light is manipulated to define the subjects and conceptions of the artist. Emphasis will be placed on the relationship of process to concept through critical engagement with works of selected artists. Students will be introduced to the environment and
methodology of the photography studio. Areas to be covered include backdrop systems; camera formats from digital single lens reflex through digital medium format and large format  cameras. The art of lighting, existing light, continuous light and flash/strobe lights will be an area of focus. Through a process of investigation students will develop work based on their conceptual   concerns. This introductory course in the art of lighting and photography studio use and function will serve them well in careers in the field

Applied Fashion Illustration I
Robert HallLaura Lee Jones

Applied Fashion Illustration I

To illustrate concepts is the basic tool for fashion illustrators. This course follows on from Fashion Illustration 1 and 2, where students were introduced to basics of illustrating the fashion figure. They were introduced to drawing the clothed figure in a number of poses to emphasize garments and accessories,to the advantage of the designer, and for editorial purposes. They will now concentrate on the ‘Fashion Industry’ related illustration. They will learn to create through design and research, sophisticated and innovative illustrations in various media for specific and realistic fashion and editorial projects.

Drawing for Design 1
Israel Delmonte

Drawing for Design 1

In this course Applied Art students explore the relationship  between drawing and design whether in Ceramic, Jewellery Textiles or Visual Communication. Students use various sources for study, including the figure, the object or simply free expression.

Concept Development through Drawing I
Greg Bailey

Concept Development through Drawing I

The purpose of this course is to aid in the development of student’s ability to widen their capacity and conscientiousness of both their environment and the world they live in. The themes given provides students with an opportunity to express their individual views in a unique framework that will reveal new creative approaches, through experiments and exploration of researching other artists in the field.

Drawing for Animation
Rachel MossShauna Gaye Murray-Coke

Drawing for Animation

This drawing course is a continuation of Issues in Drawing I. Students will continue to explore contemporary practices in drawing through their own explorations, and will develop a series of related works which explore personal issues and visual language.

Issues in Drawing IA
Israel Delmonte

Issues in Drawing IA

This drawing course will promote the use of contemporary practices found in drawing today. Emphasis will be placed on exploring alternative concepts and methodology through drawing. Experimentation play an integral role in the development of alternate concepts and students will be encouraged to work quickly and sequentially thereby enabling them to understand and develop their own process through drawing.

Fashion Illustration I
Robert Hall

Fashion Illustration I

The ability to illustrate a concept is the most basic tool of the designer’s portfolio. This course is an introduction to illustrating the fashion figure. Understanding how to draw the clothed figure in a variety of poses which emphasize the garment is an advantage for any designer who is trying to communicate their ideas. The exaggerated proportions of the fashion figure have become synonymous with fashion illustration. In this course students will explore an exaggeration of the proportions of the human figure in order to create the female, male and child fashion figures.

Anatomy of the Human Figure
Hope Brooks

Anatomy of the Human Figure

Students will study the human skeleton, - anterior and posterior view - using diagrams and reference to the actual human skeleton. Students will build on this by studying the superficial muscles of the body, front view and rear view, of the arms, hands and legs front and rear view. The names of the important superficial muscles will be part of the study and annotated drawings will be required of the front and rear torso as well as arms hands legs and feet. The study of the anatomy of the human figure will be supported by drawing form the live model throughout the course and therefore their knowledge of what appears on the surface and contours of the life model. This may also be applied in other media such as sculpture, painting illustration etc wherever the human figure is the subject.

Drawing from Observation
Raymond Watson

Drawing from Observation

This course introduces the analytical and expressive drawing of objects. From lighting, spatial relationship and other techniques are investigated. Students begin to develop fluency in drawing and start to pursue a personal approach.

Life Drawing
Raymond Watson

Life Drawing

The human figure, its positions, movement, relationship to the environment, will be thoroughly studied from the life model. Anatomy will be introduced and the discipline of building a drawing through stages will be emphasized.